It is currently August 29th, 2014, 6:07 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot] and 1 guest
Author Message
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 9:13 am 
Offline
Epsilon
Epsilon


Joined: November 9th, 2011, 7:43 pm
Posts: 1888

The Amish people and the Mennonites are adopting children so they can clean up their gene pool , there are a few defects the Amish and Mennonite have from inbreeding .. one is called the founders disease .. so they are adopting kids so they can clean up their gene pool .. they adopt these kids work them like a dog ... they are only allowed to go to school until the 8th grade ?? if I stopped my child from going to school at the 8th grade level .. I would be in jail .. I really don't have a problem with the kids working as they do ... coming from ky as I do .. all the kids used to work hard here .. times have changed and now its the mexicans and Amish that work hard in the fields .. field work is beneath most kids/ teens :-j .. I dont think they should be allowed to adopt ,, they are adopting breeders .. and to not let a kid have an educations .. i mean it kinda makes me sick to know this .. just kinda twisted .. dont you think ? that the government allows this .. who is the boss over this crap ?


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 11:26 am 
Offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
User avatar


Joined: November 16th, 2009, 12:01 pm
Mood: Cool
Posts: 25248
Location: 34° 57' 11" N / 120° 26' 5" W

:-o :-o :-o :-o wow grammaw thats awful..... I think adopting kids is a great thing but then to use them like that, thats just wrong....

do their "own" children work like that? stop schooling in the 8th grade??

_________________
ImageImage
To learn who rules over you, find out who you CAN'T criticize....... VoltaireImage


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  

For this message the author mom has received thanks: me grammaw
  Rating: 9.09%
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 11:37 am 
Offline
Most Entertaining
Most Entertaining
User avatar


Joined: April 10th, 2012, 11:47 am
Posts: 5212
Location: Canada

I like the 1800's lifestyle of the Amish and Mennonite ...but that's 'weird'.

Further...
I should think adults joining the fold would bring new blood.
...but, I guess, nobody ever wants to join them. Image
No back-to-the-landers join? Image


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  

For this message the author Millie_Me has received thanks: me grammaw
  Rating: 9.09%
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 3:20 pm 
Offline
Epsilon
Epsilon


Joined: November 9th, 2011, 7:43 pm
Posts: 1888

Main article: Amish life in the modern world
Horsedrawn grey buggy in multilane auto traffic, with rearview mirrors, directional signals, lights, and reflectors
Traditional Amish buggy

As time has passed, the Amish have felt pressures from the modern world. Issues such as taxation, education, law and its enforcement, and occasional discrimination and hostility, are areas of difficulty.

The Amish way of life in general has increasingly diverged from that of modern society. On occasion, this has resulted in sporadic discrimination and hostility from their neighbors, such as throwing of stones or other objects at Amish horse-drawn carriages on the roads.[42][43][44]

The Amish do not usually educate their children past the eighth grade, believing that the basic knowledge offered up to that point is sufficient to prepare one for the Amish lifestyle. Almost no Amish go to high school and college. In many communities, the Amish operate their own schools, which are typically one-room schoolhouses with teachers (young unmarried women) from the Amish community. On May 19, 1972, Jonas Yoder and Wallace Miller of the Old Order Amish, and Adin Yutzy of the Conservative Amish Mennonite Church, were each fined $5 for refusing to send their children, aged 14 and 15, to high school. In Wisconsin v. Yoder, the Wisconsin Supreme Court overturned the conviction,[45] and the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed this, finding the benefits of universal education do not justify a violation of the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment.[46]

Like other citizens, Amish pay sales and property taxes. However, Amish buggies, bicyclists, and pedestrians use public highways, but need not pay either motor vehicle registration fees or motor fuel taxes.[47] Under their beliefs and traditions, the Amish do not agree with the idea of social security benefits and have a religious objection to insurance. On this basis, the United States Internal Revenue Service agreed in 1961 that they did not need to pay Social Security related taxes. In 1965, this policy was codified into law.[48] Self-employed individuals in certain sects do not pay into, nor receive benefits from, United States Social Security. This exemption applies to members of a religious group that is conscientiously opposed to accepting benefits of any private or public insurance, provides a reasonable level of living for its dependent members and has existed continuously since December 31, 1950.[49] The U.S. Supreme Court in 1982 clarified that Amish employers are not exempt, but only those Amish individuals who are self-employed.[50] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amish


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 3:31 pm 
Offline
Epsilon
Epsilon


Joined: November 9th, 2011, 7:43 pm
Posts: 1888

Background Essay
Discussion Questions
Standards

Eastern Pennsylvania is home to beautiful farmlands and countryside, but it's also a gold mine of information for geneticists, who have studied the region's Amish culture for decades. Because of their closed population stemming from a small number of German immigrants -- about 200 individuals -- the Amish carry unusual concentrations of gene mutations that cause a number of otherwise rare inherited disorders, including forms of dwarfism.

One form of dwarfism, Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, involves not only short stature but polydactyly (extra fingers or toes), abnormalities of the nails and teeth, and, in about half of individuals, a hole between the two upper chambers of the heart. The syndrome is common in the Amish because of the "founder effect."

When a small part of a population moves to a new locale, or when the population is reduced to a small size because of some environmental change, the genes of the "founders" of the new society are disproportionately frequent in the resulting population.

If individuals in the group tend to marry within it, there's a greater likelihood that the recessive genes of the founders will come together in the cells that produce offspring. Thus diseases of recessive genes, which require two copies of the gene to cause the disease, will show up more frequently than they would if the population married outside the group.

In the Amish, in fact, Ellis-van Creveld syndrome has been traced back to one couple, Samuel King and his wife, who came to the area in 1744. The mutated gene that causes the syndrome was passed along from the Kings and their offspring, and today it is many times more common in the Amish population than in the American population at large.

The founder effect is an extreme example of "genetic drift." Genes occurring at a certain frequency in the larger population will occur at a different frequency -- more or less often -- in a smaller subset of that population. As in the example of human diseases, genetically determined traits that would ordinarily be uncommon in the overall gene pool might crop up with distressing frequency in a small subset of that pool.http://access.teachersdomain.org/resour ... index.html


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 5:03 pm 
Offline
Tau
Tau
User avatar


Joined: March 1st, 2010, 2:24 pm
Posts: 7712
Images: 0

Hell, Grammaw.....and here I am thinking all along, that the reason for having kids is to pick up some slack and take out the trash and stuff. Cleaning up the gene pool is a bonus!! Are you telling me this is a BAD thing? I think I've been had!!!! :)) :)) :))

_________________
Image


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 5:48 pm 
Offline
Omega
Omega
User avatar


Joined: November 15th, 2009, 10:14 pm
Mood: Tired
Posts: 16383
Images: 43
Location: Toronto suburbs, Ontario, Canada

I hadn't heard about the adoptions, but, it stands to reason they would need an infusion of "new blood". How sad that they are using the children for slave labour, but, the rest is part and parcel of their religion and always has been. Thanks for sharing, Grammaw; very interesting.

_________________
Image
Image

THE DOGLADY'S DEN


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 6:03 pm 
Offline
Epsilon
Epsilon


Joined: November 9th, 2011, 7:43 pm
Posts: 1888

Sunday's TLC premiere of Breaking Amish gave viewers a rare look into the inside struggles of those who become curious while growing up in Amish and Mennonite communities. The cast members are those with wanderlust, choosing to leave their simple life behind to experience one of the most progressive and cultural cities in the world, New York City.

The cast takes a huge risk in leaving their communities. Those who choose to experience life on the outside are often shunned and disallowed from returning.

For two of the deserters, Jeremiah, 32, who is Amish, and Sabrina, 25, who is a Mennonite, the repression and seclusion along with their longing to see how the rest of the world lives is more bittersweet than most.

Both Jeremiah and Sabrina are adopted, which bestowed upon them some resentment.

In the first episode of Breaking Amish, which premiered Sunday night, Jeremiah, from Ohio, explains what it's like to be adopted into such a restrictive community:

"There are seven kids in the family, five of which were adopted and I'm one of them. So, I wasn't born Amish.

"Being Amish, it's like we can't do nothin'. We do everything the hard way. Just so you know, I was adopted and got kinda thrown into this Amish crap. You know, it's not cool.

"I often wonder what it would have been like, if someone else would have adopted me, like some English person."

The Amish refer to anybody outside their community as "English.".

Sabrina, from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, explains life as an adopted Mennonite, holding up a Spanish magazine to the viewers saying she subscribes to the magazine to give her insight into her heritage.

Sabrina goes onto say:

"When I was a baby, I was adopted by a Mennonite family. I'm half Italian, half Puerto Rican. I know absolutely nothing about these cultures."

The Mennonite co http://www.examiner.com/article/breakin ... -resentful


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 6:43 pm 
Offline
Epsilon
Epsilon


Joined: November 9th, 2011, 7:43 pm
Posts: 1888

Iyam wrote:
Hell, Grammaw.....and here I am thinking all along, that the reason for having kids is to pick up some slack and take out the trash and stuff. Cleaning up the gene pool is a bonus!! Are you telling me this is a BAD thing? I think I've been had!!!! :)) :)) :))
they are not having them .. they are adopting ..


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 7:11 pm 
Offline
Epsilon
Epsilon


Joined: November 9th, 2011, 7:43 pm
Posts: 1888

Iyam wrote:
Hell, Grammaw.....and here I am thinking all along, that the reason for having kids is to pick up some slack and take out the trash and stuff. Cleaning up the gene pool is a bonus!! Are you telling me this is a BAD thing? I think I've been had!!!! :)) :)) :))
I mean .. does this sound right to you ? to adopt a baby just to be a breeder .. not let the child have an education ? .. does this sound ok to you .. not to adopt out of love .. to adopt breeders .. If I were to try to adopt a baby and told the agency that the child is going to work the fields all day and have school that is taught by young women that has an eighth grade education and that also the child I am adopting is not going to school past the eighth grade .. and I am so inbred that I need to adopt a baby because we need to breed new blood in our clan .. do you think the agency will let me adopt ? why hell no lol so why are they letting them adopt English baby's ?


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 7:53 pm 
Offline
Most Entertaining
Most Entertaining
User avatar


Joined: April 10th, 2012, 11:47 am
Posts: 5212
Location: Canada

I think that’s crappy that they shun deserters. – Anyone wanting to go back, would have tasted the outside world …found it undesirable …and be willing – with wisdom – to carry-on the Amish ways.
I should think a ‘returner’ would be beneficial in pointing out personally experienced flaws in outside society.
…and, maybe bring back a husband or wife with them, for future diversification of the gene pool.

...AND - with the back-up of 'returners' - it would give the elders the opportunity to say, "I told you so" to the congregation.


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 7:55 pm 
Offline
Tau
Tau
User avatar


Joined: March 1st, 2010, 2:24 pm
Posts: 7712
Images: 0

I'm sorry, G'maw.....I was just fooling around, being a wise guy, as always. The Mennonites do have a LOT of ways that don't seem right to me. Their religious ways govern everything they do, and it makes sense to them. But you're right, adopting a generation of breeders is unimaginable.

_________________
Image


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 8:44 pm 
Offline
Omega
Omega
User avatar


Joined: November 21st, 2009, 12:37 pm
Mood: Happy
Posts: 9776
Images: 2
Location: Chino, CA

In the Amish faith, you are not baptized in the actual faith until you are old enough to understand and accept the religion for life. Many young adults are allowed and do go out into the real world just to see what it is like, and then return and are baptized. The only way you are shunned is if you are baptized, then change your mind. No they do not go to school past the eighth grade in Amish country. However some of the Amish do send their children to further their education to English schools.

Look these folks live a very simple life. So there is no need for further education. Most of what they need to know to survive on their own land is learned from their own families.

As far as adoption and then turning these children into slaves??. . . . . They treat these children as their own, and do not have them do anymore then they do their own children. Many of these children who are adopted have a choice when the reach the age of maturity, just like all Amish children do to go out into the world and check it out before they accept the faith and are baptised into the faith for life. Many of these children would have been raised in foster care and turned out at 18. X( If I had a choice I would much rather see these children being raised in a wholesome loving family, with morals and teachings of love and family values. Then raised in the current foster care system.

I do not believe they are turned into red-headed step children, and mistreated in anyway.

I understand what you are saying grammaw, and I respect your opinion. However my opinion is different. My Mama's family was Pennsylvania Dutch. . . . code word Amish. My great grandmother on her Mama's side was Amish, and she was not shunned, because she made the choice to leave before she was Baptized. She did however raise her own children very much in the Amish way. As a result my own Mama was also raised very much in the Amish way, but with the modern conveniences of the English world. ;)
My grandma was a very very stearn strict women, but she would give you the workdress off her back to help out a complete stranger.
;) :D :ymhug:

_________________
ImageImageImageImageImage


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 9:04 pm 
Offline
Most Entertaining
Most Entertaining
User avatar


Joined: April 10th, 2012, 11:47 am
Posts: 5212
Location: Canada

If I may intercede here for a moment, Mama...

At what age is the baptism?
I should think a baptism, at a minimum age of 21, would be acceptable for a person to be expected to make their own 'adult' secure decisions in such matters.


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  
Unread postPosted: October 16th, 2012, 9:09 pm 
Offline
Omega
Omega
User avatar


Joined: November 21st, 2009, 12:37 pm
Mood: Happy
Posts: 9776
Images: 2
Location: Chino, CA

It is usually between the age of 18 to 21. :D

For some it is earlier, and it all depends on the young adult. Some just want to marry and start their families and their own farms. They have no desire to go out amoung the English. They do have to be baptised before they are allowed to marry. ;)

_________________
ImageImageImageImageImage


Back To Top
 Profile
Reply with quote  

For this message the author MamaV has received thanks: Millie_Me
  Rating: 9.09%
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


Protected by Anti-Spam ACP . My Friend Forum © 2009 - 2011 . Hosted by: OmidFarhang.com